Have you ever been frustrated with seasoning a cast-iron skillet? The rough surface never seems to get smooth. I’m going to show you how using some sanding Discs, and some little elbow grease. You can get this thing nice and smooth, still accepting seasoning, and cooks really well. Join me and I’ll show you how to do it I used this Lodge, I got this at Costco. It was a pot and skillet mix, and I’m Going to show you how to make it nice and smooth on the inside. Now there is some pitting and I want to be clear with you that this is something you’re going to want to do on a piece of cast iron that maybe hits the $50 Range. If you have a piece of cast iron that is of poor quality, maybe it’s very rough on the inside, or you don’t use it hardly ever. It’s not worth hardly anything, it’s a camp set, or it was a piece that you were given that you just never really got the hang of, you didn’t like the weight of it, or maybe you didn’t like cleaning it, and I’m going to show you how to sand and polish that down to a near mirror finish then I’m going to show you how to season it. I’m not doing anything out of the ordinary here. I learned a lot of this from some people on YouTube and some forums that I’ve read. If it wasn’t for these people I would not have been able to glean the amount of information that is required to do something like this, and I really do want to thank them because they didn’t set out to put that on their videos I just kind of took whatever they put out there and I compiled it together and I’m going show you just how I did it I’m taking circular sanding discs going from 40 grit and then I’m going to end with 180 grit on this video you’ll see the surface to row so please stay tuned and thanks for joining me. This is the mounting bracket that we’re using to do our initial sand On. Now you’ll notice I’m marking out the pot on that piece of wood and that is a very large chunk of wood it’s a piece of scrap that we have. If you have something smaller than that it’ll will work. I just had it available and I’m going to put it in the vise and it’s going to hold nice and sturdy. Now when I marked out the holes you’ll see that little black pattern there. I used you know a pilot, I drilled some pilot holes right in those Center marks That’s going to house the eye bolt and the you know the hook pattern that I created. It’s not, you know rocket science here. You’re just going to drill some holes. Make sure the holes are big enough to fit those hooks that are in place. You know eventually when you put this you mount this on, if they’re not in the right spot it will not hold the cast iron very well. Right below in the bottom right hand side you’ll see the bolt that I’m putting in these holes. Now here is the before shot of the cast iron that’s the skillet you’ll see some pitting in there the top right hand side of that pot, but it is quite rough and that’s from the sand casting you know when people tell me about how good Lodge skillets are I agree the metal and the shape is quite nice to look at we’re going to smooth that down. This is the mounting bracket as you see that’s being held in by that pretty strong vise and it’s not going anywhere. I put a little clamp on the back but if you look on the back really simple here we got a bolt and the eye bolts that’s made into a hook. All just going through the back held in by some nuts. Okay just excuse my camera angles here it’s important that you see that we’re going to be using this Advanti Quick Strip Disc. It’s kind of used, its rounded there and if you want to start with new one, that’s great but these things will last quite a while. I’ve done multiple pots with that one disk or skillets I should say. Then we’re going to move on to these Diablo Sanding Discs. If you’re going to use These I would suggest getting the 180 grit and then 40 grit. I just bought a package deal that had the mounting bracket you’ll see that for the discs on there. I’ll only be using the 40 grit sanding pads and the 180 grit sanding pads for this project if you want to go up higher you’re more than welcome to. Now notice how I’m just going up and down on that skillet in no particular pattern I’m just trying to get all that seasoning all that initial rough edges off that where all that sand casting is created you know those rough steel surfaces. I’m smoothing them down that’s all I’m doing here. Take your time push hard if you wish. What I found with the Avanti quick strip disc is it’s no real match for this cast iron. It’s going to take off that that initial roughness but it’s it’s not going to get it down the way you want to see that sand and just take it down. I bought two sets of these at Costco for 50 bucks they were on sale. I would suggest that you you’re not going to put do this on anything that is of value. Some people say don’t do this project this is you know so waste just properly seasoned it and you’ll be fine. You know I would argue that the older cast iron that everyone loves so much, it was pre-sanded after the manufacturing process before it was seasoned and it went out in the Field. You had that option to get it sanded prior to seasoning. For years people cooked on that and the surface was nice and smooth and it accepted that seasoning quite well. Today’s cast iron they don’t offer that and you know some of them you know I own some Finex skillets and they’re machined smooth and when you get that back home you’ll see that it’s it’s got literally a machine smooth like very you know uniform rings that are ground into that that skillet. If we can take a closer look sorry about the jiggling there you’ll see that I’ve taken off the initial roughness there but there are still pitting marks like in the top right hand side you see that little darker pitting mark there. But it is shiny. When you first do this that shiny look is gonna make you feel all tingly inside. Now here’s the mounting bracket just put it that hook in there that handle. Then we put the bolt on the other side with some washers and nut and we’re gonna hold it in place I didn’t show you that I had readjusted that eye bolt or hook because the skillet is a little bit deeper there but it works just the same hole patterns are in the same spot. I’m tightening it down I’m not worried too much about it Bending. People said you’re gonna bend that handle off and cause it to crack we’re not putting that much stress on the cast iron. All we’re doing here is holding it flat to that wood so it won’t move around. You’ll see that I initially start on this Advanti Quick Strip Disc and it moves a little bit and I have to readjust the you know the nuts and the washers in order to tighten down. If I can suggest anything if you look at me right now I’m wearing safety glasses hearing protection and a mask a breathing mask and if you look at OHS regulations you know safety safe exposure to dusts. Certain dusts are way more dangerous than others and and steel dust cast iron when it’s you know dust form it is hazardous at a certain level it’s not as hazardous as silica or asbestos by far but when I first did this project it was in my lungs and it didn’t escape my lungs for a few days. We’re talking like rusty black mucus through the nostrils tasting rust it wasn’t I mean it was an exciting thing at the time but you know I should have worn a masks and I wanted to make sure I wore that mask this time. It doesn’t show here but after I was done this process I was covered in a steel dusty film all over. If I can at this point I’m going to say you know the Advanti Quick Strip Disc gives you the comfortable feel of using that drill and you know I would say if you’re gonna do it, do it but if not the sanding discs will be enough they’ll just wear out a lot faster than that initial grind because of the you know that rough surface that you get from the sand casting. Eventually I’m going to show you you know the after shot here and similar to the skillet it’s nice and smooth and shiny in it you’ll it’ll make you feel like you’ve accomplished something but don’t stop at the Advanti stage. Get those sanding discs out and really work that surface make it nice and smooth and guys will say well why? Why make it so Smooth? there’s no reason why don’t we just buy you know stainless steel or you can buy a carbon you know carbon steel and you know that you can do that. I have no problem with you guys doing that. For my curiosity I wanted to see if this could be done and I find that working with cast iron is not as hard as it sounds. A few rules you have to follow but being able to take this in and out of the oven having the ability to put it on any sort of stove be it gas, Fire, camp fire, induction, it’s just so versatile and if you treat it right it’s gonna treat you right for literally your entire life. Imagine spending $50 on a piece of cast iron and you give it to your children’s children that’s how long the stuff lasts so let’s take a look here see it’s nice and smooth there’s still that that pitting I didn’t get all of it that Advanti quick strip disc just doesn’t get the corners as well as you might want it to. I did get most of the seasoning and most of that rough edge rough shouldn’t say edge that the sand casting. Now this is the 40 grit sanding disc that I used from Diablo. I bought all my stuff at Home Depot you can buy it wherever you wish but you’re just going back and forth like you were sanding a floor. You’re not going to do as much damage as you would sanding a floor but you are gonna take off metal and you’ll see that you’ll see the metal you know bursts out in these big puffs of dust that come out it’s about -4C I think it was it was quite nice outside that day I have a well ventilated room here that I’m using the doors literally wide open to the outside. You’re you want to take off as much of that metal as possible. You’re gonna go through multiple 40 grit disc Pads. I said before use the velcro version unless you really do like peeling off bits of sandpaper off the bottom of this this rubber jig or mounting bracket because hit is it will ruin your fingers. It ruined mine I should have I should have went to the velcro I just didn’t this time I don’t know why. I don’t show you the 180 grit sanding of this I think I’ve shown you enough of an example of how to sand the Surface. Feel comfortable with it. I’m gonna show you what it looks like with the 40 grit you’ll see that there’s the you know visible scratch marks inside of There. Most of that sand casting is smooth down. A few of the deeper areas you know I spent a little more time and got a little deeper on there.. You can go you know you can take half a millimeter off and be still safe with that pot. I was good you know I I’ll show you what happens after the hundred eighty right here. I washed them with soap and water dried them and it’s nice and shiny you’ll see how shiny that is. My first video that’s what I wanted to see I was looking for that stainless steel look but you really don’t want to end off with a shiny look. What you want to do is put this in a oven clean a cycle of your oven. Let that oven heat up nice and hot. Kind of anneal the metal temperate by letting it cool down and then you’re gonna get this grayish metal that results from it. Now after you season it I’ll show you the seasoning process here. It’s gonna look nice and gray patina. It’ll blacken over time but that’s beautiful like that is that’s what you’re looking to do nice and smooth. The surface still has some imperfections and it’s not perfect you know I’m not a perfect person yet at this but I am happy with the results they’re. If you’re gonna season this I would suggest using the links that you’re seeing it right in front of you on this Page. “The Culinary Fanatic” “Boedy Pennington”, these guys have really great methods for seasoning and it’s not about all that oil and just letting it go it’s it’s about a small amount of oil letting it plasticize or season and then doing multiple layers of that. Thank you for your time, thank you for watching and try this yourself it’s worth it

Sanding, Polishing, & Seasoning Lodge Cast Iron Skillet
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100 thoughts on “Sanding, Polishing, & Seasoning Lodge Cast Iron Skillet

  • November 12, 2018 at 3:39 am
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    I sanded mine smooth and washed it out. It was shiny and right after I dried it the pan started turning a golden color. Is this rust happening? I sanded it quick again and it looked nice. The second after I dry it it starts turning brown. Should i season it? Or is this rust bad to have on there?

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  • November 13, 2018 at 5:56 pm
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    This is basically the method I use to re-finish pans too.
    I use a more powerful drill with a handle.
    I start with sandpaper, the quick strip disc was a waste of money IMO.

    I remove a lot more material than shown in this vid. All the little bumps telegraph through your seasoning causing sticking. I like to only see the big pits left.
    With the backing pad you can push really hard and get it to bend into the corners. All those little pits in the corner contribute to stuff I bake sticking.

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  • November 14, 2018 at 1:52 am
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    Thanks. I think I would go straight to the 40 grit sanding disc.

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  • November 14, 2018 at 2:16 am
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    I have all kinds of old/new(er) cast iron cookware, even a 43 year old Wagner pan I bought new, and really, they're all great, but they all behave a little differently. I really think it just comes down to personal preference. But I do have a couple of newer pieces I clamped down to a jig and ground/sanded smooth. One is a Lodge chef pan, and to this day, after buying/using cast iron cookware for more than 40 years, it's my favorite. It has a beautiful, smooth patina and food just slips and slides all over the inside of it.

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  • November 14, 2018 at 1:27 pm
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    Held in place by CARRIAGE BOLTS, not EYE BOLTS.

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  • November 28, 2018 at 2:57 pm
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    i love my t fal pan cast iron is way too much bs

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  • December 6, 2018 at 6:42 pm
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    Great video. I have many lodge skillets etc, but once in a while I'll get one that just don't want a season. I do what you did here and it makes a huge difference. Not to mention I like to display my cast iron in my kitchen and it looks much better smooth.

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  • December 6, 2018 at 7:12 pm
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    I bought a Lodge skillet and thought about going through this process. I decided to try and use it as is on some scrambled eggs. They didn't stick, so I'm not going to bother. Your results may differ.

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  • December 6, 2018 at 7:53 pm
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    It truely is a mess, I did this with a facemask and a goggle that was covering my face like a diving mask. Only I forgot that I took out the little rubber seals on the sides to have it vented better. Thus, I startet feeling the dust parts in my eyes in the middle of the night, which really got the longest one I remember so far… ;-/ (still have my eye-sight, but…)

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  • December 15, 2018 at 6:27 am
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    your an idiot lodge cooks just fine right out of the box

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  • December 20, 2018 at 5:02 am
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    Cast iron is wonderful cooking gear, so many people can’t understand why go to all this trouble. Because it’s a heritage, because it’s fun, it’s something Americans have done for generations, it’s part of our history, nothing cooks as good as a piece of cast iron, if you love to cook, get into it, it’s just part of the heritage and adventure and incredible food.

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  • December 21, 2018 at 4:56 pm
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    Is it safe to remove the coating ,then the food is exposed to the metal?

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  • December 24, 2018 at 7:45 pm
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    Lodge could solve a lot of arguing between its customers, by making a smooth version and a porous version for people to buy what they want

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  • December 28, 2018 at 7:23 pm
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    Wow those turned out beautiful. I wish I'd started my pans like this, because that slick finish really looks amazing.

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  • December 29, 2018 at 4:35 am
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    Glad your project came out. I bought my Lodge skillet 8 about 20 years ago cooked and burnt a lot of stuff then one day burnt something really bad. I waited about a week, scraped the hwll out of it then used a wire wheel then sanded by hand. Reseasoned and it has gotten better and better. Now almost glass smooth. Cooks eggs like a champ. Just was gifted my grandmother's 80 year Wagner #8. Surface looks about the same. Cant wait to cook on it.

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  • December 29, 2018 at 1:12 pm
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    I just found your video, and I have t say, that right out of the gate, you are a class act. Great of you to give credit where credit is due!… Now back to the video. 🙂 It is great to see that you are using breathing protection, a short discussion about safe work practices would have been a good thing.

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  • January 1, 2019 at 3:14 am
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    Great job

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  • January 3, 2019 at 8:46 am
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    Dont post this on the Cast Iron Community page! They frown upon it and will ban you for absolutely no reason at all!

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  • January 4, 2019 at 8:42 am
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    Superb, well done that man, long life to you and your pan.

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  • January 4, 2019 at 11:58 am
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    As you sand, you rip up little bits and are left with small pits….how do you avoid this? I followed a similar process for my pans and noticed I had created pits. Sure the seasoning fills them in to a degree, but how can we avoid them? Using a higher grit sandpaper?

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  • January 5, 2019 at 6:46 pm
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    i never sanded or polished my lodge pans and have zero issues with sticking. I think people see a video about you should sand them and the parroting begins. nothing against people who want to do this but it's not necessary. if you want a smooth look that's a different story even though not worth the work imo. if people are having sticking issues with lodge pans they need to learn the basics. to those who think you have to spend $300 for a smooth pan, it's your money wasted, not mine.

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  • January 6, 2019 at 5:49 am
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    I did this with several of my pans. I took mine too smooth and every now and then a little pc of seasoning flakes off. the ones I took to 80 grit seem to hold on to it better. However I have vids on my channel flipping eggs cooked in them.

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  • January 8, 2019 at 2:01 pm
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    On a sanding topic, I use 24 grit paper to sand my heals on my feet smooth. This time of year. I go slow each night for about 30 days, My heal's are smooth and crack free. Same goes for my big toe. No more cracked feet. But be careful and remember this Is a cutting edge and can give yourself a burn feeling If you go to long and heavy. Just a light touch sand. Thanks for this video.

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  • January 8, 2019 at 3:24 pm
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    i'm such a lazy piece of shit this video made me go with a field co skillet instead of cheap rough lodge.

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  • January 10, 2019 at 3:22 pm
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    Nice video and results. Hey guys sanding it down is only half the story. Cast metal is still a porous material, that will be affected by all the food particles we use inside so by treating the surface deeper is the way to go. After much searching I had found this article VERY useful and logical. I like to thank the writer for his research and time for posting this it.

    This is a way to make your cast iron a real champ cooking tool. So far I had good results using peracetic acid (equal parts of white vinegar and hydrogen peroxide) on all my cast iron 14" wok and also 14" double sided griddle, and my on 12" enameled cast iron pan. Read it at the bottom of this article.

    http://www.genuineideas.com/ArticlesIndex/castironseasoning.html

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  • January 11, 2019 at 2:03 am
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    What can you do if it is deeply pitted I have an old one that is really pitted and I’m trying to find a way of salvaging it

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  • January 11, 2019 at 5:11 pm
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    How do I send the pic’s to you?

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  • January 13, 2019 at 2:11 am
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    Ok

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  • January 13, 2019 at 4:31 pm
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    Lodge isn't a real cast iron…I have all original Wagners from the 50s

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  • January 17, 2019 at 3:22 am
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    I'm pretty confident that most of the people saying that Lodge's rough surface is ok, never had a Griswald.
    Yes, you can season a rough surface; and it can still be kind of non-stick. But then there is this uneven heating problem due to the uneven surface. Parts of your egg are cooked, and parts are still uncooked, and stick to the pan.
    Simple logic shows that the smoother the beginning surface, the less surface area for food to stick too. Just don't polish the surface to a mirror finish; or the seasoning won't stick.

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  • January 19, 2019 at 12:55 pm
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    If you hate boring life story, go directly to 02:00

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  • January 19, 2019 at 2:16 pm
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    Is this what you do when you don't have a porn shooting?

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  • January 22, 2019 at 7:22 am
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    this is what you do when you can't figure out how to make a cast iron pan work for you. complain about the rough surface and then try to convince everyone to do the same shit that you do….
    smooth or rough, cast iron always cooks the same way. i've noticed lately that there is a community of idiot millennials who think they have invented cast iron and know it all when it comes to anything cast iron….. the fact of the matter is that cast iron will cook anything exactly the same whether it is rough or smooth. fools will pay hundreds of dollars for a pan believing it can out perform a $30 pan…. fucking amazing… george carlin couldn't make this shit up…..

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  • January 25, 2019 at 8:13 pm
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    Awesome video! How long does it take to do a pan would you say?

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  • January 26, 2019 at 6:03 am
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    Change speed to 1:25, thank me later.

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  • January 28, 2019 at 2:26 am
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    Wow!! Bro, those skillets look close to a Smithey skillet..

    https://shop.tastemade.com/products/smithey-cast-iron-skillets

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  • February 1, 2019 at 12:00 am
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    Another fucking idiot starting with a quick strip disc that achieves fuck all. Pussy wears every piece of safety gear he can fit on his head. Then he talks about annealing and tempering, it's cast iron you fucking moron!

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  • February 1, 2019 at 8:17 am
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    Nice to see you wearing all of the appropriate safety gear. Gloves, Glasses, Hearing, and respirator.

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  • February 2, 2019 at 5:38 am
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    Why do people feel the need to take shortcuts and grind cast iron smooth?
    After an initial seasoning in the oven, just keep using it, wipe it out and rub in a coating of oil, EVERY time you use it.
    And DO NOT WASH IT with anything other than water.
    No harsh scrubbers, no harsh chemicals.
    It takes time for the carbon layer to build up , fill in all those bumps, and get smooth, but it's worth it.
    My cast iron frying pans are the best NON stick cookware you'll find.

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  • February 2, 2019 at 1:29 pm
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    Thanks Scott did mines yesterday! Seasoned it last night cooked egg over easy and boy did it glide off like butter. Thanks!

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  • February 4, 2019 at 1:46 am
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    i love me a smooth cast iron! Great tutorial

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  • February 5, 2019 at 6:14 pm
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    why not get ceramic coated cast iron… which would be smooth?

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  • February 5, 2019 at 10:11 pm
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    Just got a new Lodge dutch oven that the lid doubles as a handle free skillet and its lumpy as hell. Gotta do this for sure. That or Im returning the pot a brand new item shouldn't need manual labor.

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  • February 9, 2019 at 9:42 pm
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    Heads up! There's been a recall on your dewalt drill used in this video. Shock hazard

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  • February 10, 2019 at 1:26 am
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    Smoooth is how Grandma rolled!

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  • February 12, 2019 at 2:34 pm
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    If you use stick on sanding pads you can easily remove them if you heat them with a paint stripping heat gun, the glue turns loose and they peel right off.

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  • February 14, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Mine's like glass. Eggs slide around with ease.

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  • February 18, 2019 at 5:18 pm
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    Not everyone has tools like that, nor do they have money to get those tools like that.
    Worthless footage for a large group of people.

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  • February 20, 2019 at 8:40 am
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    So they are junk from the factory I have one it sucks crappy product

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  • February 20, 2019 at 10:05 am
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    nice work 👍 but can you show how they look and work after seasoning? is it a slick, non-stick surface? also, you’re definitely not “annealing “ or “tempering “ metal at oven temperatures. unless if your oven has a range of thousands of degrees.

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  • February 24, 2019 at 8:01 am
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    That's to slow much faster with portable grinder and flappy disk so don't use cast iron that much so after all that. Is it none stick

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  • February 25, 2019 at 4:41 am
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    That's really cool then

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  • March 3, 2019 at 6:34 am
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    Somebody, please send this video to the management at Lodge. They need to start finishing these pans so the customers don’t have to.

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  • March 8, 2019 at 3:56 pm
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    _Nah.. Gimme a Matfer-B' instead. NO excuses for Lodge especially to be pumpin-out Crocodile-texture skillets, while even some lil' 2015-old company from PA called Stargazer Cast Iron is sanding their pans, and askin for a fair $8O.oo.
    Hey this still a nice DIY restore-project before I'd sellit on Letgo, to replace it w/ a Stargazer, US-ION or a Field skillet which come factory-smooth, AND they all weigh less than a Lodge on top of that..

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  • March 9, 2019 at 4:17 pm
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    Having a smooth Iron Skillet doesnt make you a gourmet chef,
    anymore than having a guitar makes you a musician

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  • March 11, 2019 at 6:23 pm
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    Just buy a stargazer unseasoned

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  • March 11, 2019 at 10:28 pm
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    After sanding it, it took forever to wash it clean. Then rust would pop up out of nowhere in a matter of minutes. What am I doing wrong?

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  • March 24, 2019 at 2:51 pm
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    This is worth while doing, makes a big improvement Thanks Scott for the video!

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  • March 25, 2019 at 1:05 am
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    You should've cooked an egg on it to show off it's smoothness.

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  • March 26, 2019 at 7:03 am
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    I saw your video yesterday just before my Math 12 test. After test I run to homedepot everything, spent 4hours to grind my cast iron skillets to perfection from Costco. Thanks

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  • April 6, 2019 at 4:01 am
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    I use a flap sanding disk on an angle grinder. I have a number of cast iron items, a few of which I've used tools on to smooth out, and I've gotten great results. I have an ages-old Wagner, and it came from the factory fairly smooth, so anyone that harshes on owners mechanically smoothing out their iron is just being dim.

    I love cast iron, and I was surprised to realized I do pretty much everything in iron, other than boil water.

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  • April 20, 2019 at 2:08 am
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    Works great – as long as you have your own workshop with drill, disks, clamps, scrap lumber, goggles, ear protection, face mask and everything else.

    You've got more money in the tools and other paraphernalia than the skillets. For the cost of your equipment someone could get on eBay and buy a good smooth vintage skillet and be done with it.

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  • April 21, 2019 at 2:31 pm
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    Another video on how to sand metal.Stay tuned next week when we learn how to sharpen a pencil

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  • May 4, 2019 at 8:49 pm
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    Got a link for the stuff you used?

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  • May 12, 2019 at 2:39 pm
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    Did you find a polished pan and seasoned made it any more ‘non-stick’

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  • May 18, 2019 at 1:23 am
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    Tried to watch it. Think I'll just watch the grass grow.

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  • May 26, 2019 at 11:13 am
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    Why would you buy a shit quality lodge and then still have to polish it?…

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  • June 11, 2019 at 1:00 am
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    How you clean cast iron what you do frist to clean them
    Like new. I watch people on youtube say this and that
    My rust cast iron need help to clean as soon possible
    Please me out
    Send a post

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  • June 16, 2019 at 2:33 am
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    Thank you for your information any way

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  • July 1, 2019 at 6:02 am
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    I just got my new lodge frying pan today , and all I did was wash it with soap and hot water . then fried an egg and it did not stick and it came out perfect , the only seasoning I did was put some salt on the egg

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  • July 20, 2019 at 3:41 pm
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    How high can one go on sanding grit?

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  • July 22, 2019 at 6:54 pm
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    Did you heat this up (on the oven cleaning cycle) first withOUT the oil or with? I was, before watching this awesome video, considering doing it withOUT, this time. I have suspected that the non-stickness of cast iron, might actually have more to do with the heat than what ever oil/fat we choose to use.

    And btw, I know everyone has their strong opinion 😁 but after testing with a plethora of oils, I discovered that Jojoba Oil is Amazing! I checked with the FDA, because it’s not usually a cooking oil, and their statement was that Jojoba is NOT toxic and is INgestable but not DIgestible (i.e. it will go straight threw you 😁). I figured though that such a minūte amount is left on the pan that there should be no problem. Turns out, we have never had any side effect from it other than amazing seasoning/non-stick power. Y’all should try it 👍

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  • July 25, 2019 at 8:50 am
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    A couple tips never mentioned are:

    Cast iron wears out sanding disks. Their cutting efficiency soon peters out. The shiny reflective finish you see is from the dull abrasive grains rubbing, not cutting. If you change the disk as soon as the swirl disappears you'll make quicker progress. Naturally you have to balance cutting efficiency with the cost of the disks but everything is a compromise. Sanding disks are consumables like soap and paper towels. That's why they're made to change so conveniently.

    If you encounter interior surfaces and corners (like the corners of the square pan or the grooves in the griddle) your sanding pad can't reach, check out what's available in 1/4" shanked sanding mandrels and disks. These are available in hook and loop, Roloc, and "type R" form factors from 3" dia down to 3/4" dia in most grit sizes. They may be found at home centers in the tool section, eBay, Amazon, auto parts stores, industrial supply houses of every description, etc. They're ubiquitous once you know what to look for and they are supplied by the individual item, as kits and assortments, and in bulk. Shop carefully: the same item can range from expensive to very affordable depending on the packaging, the seller, and marketing strategy.

    Thoroughly wash and scour the. pan after polishing. Dry immediately after a hot rinse. You will not like even a trace of cast iron dust in your scrambled eggs.

    Before you season the polished pan, heat it to 500 degrees (or whatever your oven maxes to) for a few hours to give the pan an oxide coat. The surface will turn a deep straw color to a purple or blue, depending on your oven. This oxide is tightly adherent and provides a very good bond with the seasoning coating. Bare shiny cast iron doesn't hold coatings very well. Season normally after the pan cools, preferably in a succession of very thin layers.

    If your pan is heavy and you know a machinist with a biggish lathe, coax him into chucking up your pan and taking a skim cut on the cooking surface. A lathe cut can do in ten minutes what you with your sanding disk would take hours. Note: cast iron pans are seldom very flat on the cooking surface and some are so warped there's no practical benefit to machining them. This is merely a suggestion that may or may not work for your particular pan.

    And yes, I've machined and polished cookware for generations of neighbors, friends, and family. That's how an old bachelor machinist repays years of home cooked dinners, kind regard, and good neighborliness..

    And that's about it.

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  • July 31, 2019 at 7:23 am
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    Thanks for the video!!! I have watched way too many videos to the point of overload… What I mean by that is, 5 people say do it 5 people say dont… However, as you mentioned, what I have is not a collectors piece and I am willing to attempt this project… My main reason for doing so is because my piece is heavily seasoned, but the seasoning is uneven and smokes, so I want to attempt your project and "reset" my pan… I personally dont feel comfortable leaving it in the oven clean cycle as my oven manufacturer tells me to remove the racks and I am not willing to risk burning the house down over a $20 dollar pan… And its over 100° in So. Cal…

    I do have a couple of questions…

    Since the pan is around 10 years old and used often should I just take the seasoning off and not sand it to the point of polish?

    What are your thoughts on seasoning with Avocado oil due to the high smoke point? 10 yaers ago I believe I used vegetable or olive oil to season and probably not correctly… My wife is tired of the smoke alarm going off when I am trying to make a late night ribeye or pork chop… The real reason I want to attempt this project… LOL…

    Thanks again for the videos on this subject…

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  • August 12, 2019 at 4:02 am
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    1:57 starts the process

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  • August 15, 2019 at 8:15 pm
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    Spend a few more bucks and buy a Field. American made, and ready to roll…. ???

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  • August 20, 2019 at 12:45 am
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    Listen up. Smooth or rough
    Properly seasoned both work fine. I bought two identical pans one sanded shit out of. The other I did add 4 layers seasoning as opposed to 3 on the sanded. After 6 months of regular use both are equal
    Just my two cents

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  • September 9, 2019 at 3:46 am
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    Old skillets were not preseasoned before sold. They were all raw and had to be seasoned at home. Americans weren't pussys like today. Lodge started the preseasoning in the 90s to boost sales. Rough nonsmooth surface was placed by lodge to hold the factory soy oil. Now every Asian company dose the same to remain competitive. FUCK new lodge pans and go to the swap meet. Buy vintage.

    MAKE 🇺🇸 G. A.

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  • September 12, 2019 at 7:06 am
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    I agree with you. My best ones I sanded down. And. Seasoned with Avocado oil. Avacado has a 500* Smoke point. Best oil hands down.

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  • September 12, 2019 at 7:57 am
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    I know this is a long comment but you'll find it interesting. 🙂
    Lodge USED to machine their products in the "good old dsys," when they had completion. Now that they have 95% of the market, they choose to save a few bucks and leave it rough. They still use a better casting process compared to the import pieces from China but not as heavy as it used to be. I have new and old on my kitchen racks. I, also, have several older pieces (not lodge) that are finely machined and it's easy to season and cooks great.
    I use an electrolysis process to restore old, crud and rust covered cast and reseason.
    The best way to season cast iron, bar none, for ease and the ultimate non-stick finish that won't turn rancid is to use rendered beef tallow.
    When you cook some beef and put the leftover juice/gravy in the fridge and the hard, white layer of fat forms on top, that's rendered tallow.
    It takes several LIGHT coats, not one thick coat, to initially season a pan. Heat the oven to 400°, bake the piece(s) for a FULL hour then turn off the oven and DO NOT open the door until the oven is back to room temp. Unlike seasoning with oils, you won't smoke yourself out of the house, either.
    From then on, every time you do a steak or burgers, bacon, etc. The seasoning layer will build up. The fats turn into a type of polymer, almost like a plastic. After enough steaks grin the bottom of my favorite pan is covered with a "plastic" layer a good 1/4" thick.
    A thick season in the bottom of a pan will feel slick as a skating rink and be amazingly non-stick, with liquids just rolling out like water off a well waxed car. If food burns and sticks a bit, just take a wooden utensil and, with a hot pan, scrape the sticky bits loose then give a quick blast of cold water in the sink and the pan will be good to go. You may want to wipe it out with a paper towel if there is any residue but you're good.
    Deglazing a hot pan with wine, cider-vinegar or water helps for pans with heavy cooking residue. Always scrape off any stuck food, as I said, with a WOODEN (or silicone coated) utensil in a HOT pan. That said, you absolutely can wash your seasoned cast iron in soapy water. Lodge even makes a bristled scrub brush that is designed to not damage your hard earned season job.
    Washing in soap will not ruin the finish or make it "taste soapy." Simply rinse well in warm/hot water until the soap is well rinsed out. That's it. No dishwashers or all bets are off. It will m.j let off the season layer and the pan will rust. But a well seasoned pan is so easy to clean, I usually just have to wipe it out when I'm done cooking. 🙂
    If you do wash your pan thoroughly, put it on the stove, heat it up and make sure it's very dry, just to be sure no rust starts. You can then (while its hot) rub in a small amount of tallow or a tbs spoon of high temp cooking oil, like canola or regular olive oil (extra virgin won't take high heat!).
    Always use regular olive oil to fry/season and extra virgin to put in your food! Just rub in the oil well and wipe out any excess. It should feel almost dry to the touch. Almost. 🙂
    Use this same process to clean and reseason your copper coated, non-stick modern pans, as well! They claim "use no oil!" and show eggs slide out of the pan… BUT, if you read the small print in the instructions, it tells you that you must first season the pan as above (tablespoon of high temp oil rubbed into a hot pan) and to reseason after every machine/thorough washing!
    You dont need to add EXTRA oil or fat to cook in those newfangled pans, IF you season with only high temp oil. NO extra virgin olive oil or PAM type cooking spray or it will burn and turn your pan dark and loose the non-stick-ability. Sneaky little buggers, they dont tell you that part.
    I mentioned all that because, though you cant really see it against the dark, cast iron, cooking spray and non-high temp oil will cause your food to burn much more easily and you'll be scraping and reasoning a lot more than you need. 🙂
    If you really wanna go the extra step, save your beef fat trimmings in the freezer when you trim up your meat. Then when you have some saved up, put them in a pot on med-low heat and let it go until all the little meat bits are crispy and floating on top. It takes a while, be patient. Skim off the bits of meat and debris, pour into ramekins or small cups to cool and you have a beef tallow that is good for everything from seasoning cast to cooking your favorite foods (instead of oils) to making candles!
    If the power goes out and you have no candles or flashlights, just poke a hole into a piece of tallow, insert a wick (in a pinch, use kitchen twine dipped in hot fat and let cool) and you have a great candle!! And for the best French fries you've ever eaten, just fry your 'taters in rendered beef tallow (that's what put McDonald's on the map) and hit them with some salt while still hot… Yeah, buddy.
    Enjoy!

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  • September 12, 2019 at 3:51 pm
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    I just don't understand. I can get one of those skillets for about $20 where I live. Why would you put that much work into a poorly made skillet. Just spend a few extra dollars and buy one that was seasoned properly and already smooth.

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  • September 13, 2019 at 2:32 am
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    Nice video. The lazy man’s way is to go to eBay and buy some Griswold skillets. They were the predecessor to Wagner and Lodge.

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  • September 14, 2019 at 12:07 pm
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    Great video…sanding and seasoning is key

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  • September 18, 2019 at 5:18 pm
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    Have you tried to give a Lodge the once over with the Avanti pro to remove the high points and then re-seasoning? That might be enough. It won't look as nice as your work but it may be all you need to make it equally non-stick. I am convinced that oven seasoning is the only way to go for it's uniformity, I've used that for my carbon steel skillets and woks with good success. If only I could learn how to cook!

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  • September 22, 2019 at 1:18 am
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    I am so pleased to see you with eye & respiratory protection.
    You got subbed big guy💥

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  • September 29, 2019 at 5:37 am
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    You talk too much.

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  • September 30, 2019 at 12:57 am
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    I have a really bad skillet. Can u spay a oven cleaner to get the top layer off. It is very bad condition..

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  • October 3, 2019 at 4:18 am
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    I've done it both ways. I've sanded it down extremely smooth.. say 98% smooth like glass with only very deep pits that showed. I've also sanded it for maybe 15-20 mins with a 40 grit then finished with a 220 grit using an orbital sander. From my personal experience of using the two at least 4 times a week, I can say that the quick rough sand is much much better than the glass finish. I cannot for the life of me get the glass to keep seasoning. It'll take seasoning pretty well but it'll lose it quick if I don't maintain it. The rough orbital sander pans have much better hold for seasoning and I can even use a scraper to clean the roughest parts out quickly and easily instead of having to scrub forever or spend 30 mins with a plastic scraper.

    I've actually repurchased a few pans that I have glass finished just so I could have the better seasoning on the rougher sand job. I can cook just about anything and clean up is quick and easy with a metal scraper that you'd use with something like a flat griddle. I wipe it down or if it's extra nasty I'll wash it then dry it on the stove with a light coat of oil to the point of smoking then turn it off and let it rest until next use.

    Also I've found with seasoning is it's best to bake on a few super thin layers of some high smoke point oil. I personally like peanut oil since it smells sweet when smoking and doesn't stink as much as others. Do a few cycles of burning off oil. Most would say to let it completely cool but I'm impatient and usually just let it cool for a few mins so I can throw on a new layer and just repeat that for a few hours with maybe 30 mins in between cycles. Once it's done then burn some oil off like you're cooking something (outside because it will get very smokey). You can it to cake up and get nasty and like tar because this creates the final super slick layer that will last forever. I'd recommend using a scraper to pull the layers off and keep it smooth as you can.

    Down the road if you notice it sticking a little just do a new stovetop burn and it should go back to normal. You can spend hours and hours doing it perfectly but ultimately it's a tool and meant to be used and beat up and abused but also taken care of.

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  • October 16, 2019 at 2:24 am
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    Killed it on this video! Perfect short instructions. Video quality on point. Audio same. Huge fan right now! Nice job!

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  • October 19, 2019 at 10:58 am
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    I did that to my carbon steel 10 inch and now I can barely get the gas cooker low enough for a fried egg. Its that efficient now and it's like marbles on ice

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  • October 27, 2019 at 5:19 am
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    Nice job, thanks for sharing. GF1 👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍👍😁😁😁😁😁😁😁😁😁😁😎

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  • October 30, 2019 at 5:53 pm
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    It would be helpful to discuss what you're doing with the back or bottom of the skillet.

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  • November 8, 2019 at 4:40 am
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    Very nice that you acknowledged other “you-tubers”. Enjoyed this video. Great job!

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  • November 8, 2019 at 4:43 am
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    Scott, is there anyway for me to get a smoother finish on my rough lodge without all of these tools? I just don’t have the access. Any advice would be appreciated.

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  • November 12, 2019 at 2:44 am
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    To avoid the dust maybe use a wet sanding technique.

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  • November 17, 2019 at 2:15 am
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    Noooooooo sanding ! People will see this in ruin old cast-iron.

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  • November 20, 2019 at 11:34 am
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    i love it ..thats how i do it..awesome

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  • November 23, 2019 at 10:00 pm
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    The very 1st question of this video

    YES YES YES

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  • November 24, 2019 at 6:12 am
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    Good video, and thanks for sharing. You DON’T ever smooth good cast-iron cookware. There is a reason that the top CI cookware (from low-priced Lodge, up though Le Creuset to almost priceless vintage), employs a rough surface. My GW Erie is all roughed, which adds about $2,500- $4,500 more per pan for good reason. The smoothed Griswold’s are worth less than half— maybe $2-3K per pan.

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