– Have you ever been on a road trip and you end up somewhere with your Tesla that doesn’t have a charger? You know that your only option then is a regular outlet
that you get in a house, 110 or 120 volts, and it
charges really, really slowly. Well, why can’t you just plug two outlets into the Tesla at the same time? There’s a lot of reasons that are definitely above my pay grade, but that’s what this item here, what’s inside this box is aiming to solve. (upbeat music) So this is the Quick 220 charging system. You get a little GFI tester thing. I’ll explain what that’s for in a minute. And you get this box and an adapter. And with this box, the Quick 220, you do exactly kind of what that, you know, what I suggested. You plug it into two different outlets. It combines the power of them and gives you, essentially,
double the charge. The idea is that you could
essentially take this item and just plug these two
ends into different outlets, and Bob’s your uncle. Then you plug it in here. Now, this looks weird, right? See, you notice how the the eyes of it are angled differently than a normal one? Well, these guys at Quick Charge Power, which is a San Diego company, it makes all these kind of cool adapters and stuff for EVs, and
they’ve been doing it forever, they make an adapter for that. I know there’s probably other
ones that you can order, but this is the one I got here. They let me borrow this,
as well as this item here. And the idea is you simply
plug this guy into it. And the first time I tried
this, it was a little sticky, but there you go, maybe
that works better now. You plug that into it, and then
you plug your Tesla charger into the other end of this. And then from there, you
should get double the amount of energy out of the house that you’re in. So the trick or the difficult part is these two ends can’t be plugged in to the same phase. Now, a phase is essentially two circuits for a house here in the
US that split 240 volts into 120 volts, which is
typically what an outlet has here. So those can’t be on the same one. Otherwise, you’re only
gonna get effectively the same as you’d get by
plugging in just to one. Now, there is a light in
here that will turn on when it indicates that
you’ve done it correctly. And this little GFI tester here is something that you
can get from all over, Home Depot, Amazon, whatever, to tell you whether or not the the line that you’re connecting to for
this guy is wired correctly because there are some challenges. There are some issues. But before we get into any of that, let’s give it a go and see what happens. Boom. We did it first try. Okay, so one is set up
over by the kitchen, and the other one’s in the entryway. It’s my house, so I happen
to know that that would work. So let’s try actually
charging the Tesla now. I’m gonna get an extension cord here. Yeah, it’s kind of a short one, but it’ll be good for my experiment. Okay. Okay, that’s good. So it has the green light
which means it does have power. Let’s see when we, if it’ll open it when I push the button. Okay, another good sign. Green, baby! Oh, red! Okay, let’s see what happened. Charging equipment fault. Okay, so something up with
the charging equipment. I’m gonna unplug this. That seemed to have,
is no longer, it’s red. This guy is red. It’s got a red dot there. You can see that. Okay, now the question is are one of these not wired correctly, which could very much be the case. Now, that’s where this little
GFI thing comes into place because what it’ll do is it
will show you the bottom two, if these both light up
correct, then it’s good. Now, my house was built
in the 50s, so who knows. All right so I’m gonna unplug this and plug this guy in and see what we get. Okay, both of those are
good, so that means good. Now, let’s test the other one here. Ah, got it. First test unsuccessful because
typical stuff you might find in an older home, 1950s built, electrical wasn’t what it is today. So I need to find a different outlet. Let’s go. So in my garage we have a bunch here, and this guy that owned
the home originally was kind of a whatever. So can’t even see if those have power. Okay I don’t know if you can see that, but though those are well lit. Okay, so I’ll plug this guy into here. There’s my actual NEMA 14-50. And then we’ll take this back into here. So now when I plug this in, this guy should light up if
they’re on different circuits, which would make sense
because one’s in the garage and one’s in the kitchen. So let’s see. Dink, there we go. And let’s see what
happens now with the car because before it said charger fault. Let’s go, start charging. Now, 12 amps is kind of a lot, but let’s just say start charging. Charge now instead, yes. Okay, here we go. Four, five, six, seven, right. Perfect. Okay, so we’re getting six miles per hour, so I’ve doubled my charging speed. So 230 volts coming in doubled my charging speed almost exactly. Let’s do the same thing. I’m gonna unplug this. Okay, unplugged. And now I’m just gonna
plug the Tesla charger into one of the wall outlets directly. Okay, so it’s in the wall. We’re good. Now, I’m gonna try one
more time just to show you that what it would normally give. Okay, so plug it in. This should go green, or I
might have to click it again. Let’s go see. Charge it, yeah, ’cause
schedule charging is on. Okay. Let’s go start charging. Start. Starting to charge. There we go. One, two, ooh two miles per
hour hundred, 108 volts. All right, so it worked. All right, so there you have it. It works when you have it on two different phases, as you saw. Make sure, the GFI thing
is actually super useful because I got that charger fault. And then you saw what it’s like if you only have a regular plug. So that’s where this
like massive difference. I mean six miles per hour,
if you’re there for 10 hours, 60 miles of range, like
you’re staying overnight, that kind of thing, that’s great. Otherwise, you’re looking at 30 miles of range overnight charging, if that. That’s really difficult
if you’re in like a town and you’re not just passing through. So yeah, let’s head back in, talk just about a couple other things that you might want to know. So cool. (laughs) Yes, you can take two
regular outlets in a home, connect them together using this to double your charging
speed, as you just saw. Tricks, obviously, or tips, a GFI tester, super good,
especially if you’re not sure about when the home was built
or how the electrical was. As you saw in my home here, where one of them wasn’t working, so we got that charge fault here. Yeah, these are pretty cheap, whatever. You can get them at a local hardware store kind of a thing. The adapter here from
Quick Charge is great because the kind of charge, or the kind of outlet they put
here isn’t your standard one, so your Tesla plug won’t go directly in. I believe they used to actually sell one, but they stopped doing it
from what I understand. So you’ll need this. Again, relatively inexpensive. The unit itself, super cool. These cables I wish were
maybe a whole lot longer, as you saw, ’cause you need some additional extension cords with you. And then your universal mobile connector, the the portable charger
from Tesla that you’ll get when you buy the car with the
regular kind of 120 outlet, the regular outlet kind of adapter. This is one of the older models. If you have a newer Model 3 or
even one of the newer things, it plugs, this whole unit comes out, so it looks a little bit
differently, but whatever. It’s the same thing. So if you get it from Tesla
you know you’ll have it. So try to make sure you’re not plugging it into something that,
an outlet or a circuit where the the refrigerator is connected because that could come on randomly, and then you’re already
pulling a ton of power, you could pop that circuit, and then it would not, the
fridge would stop running, which would mean your food would go bad or that kind of thing. Plus, you would lose charge, or you’re charging would stop altogether. So it’s one of those
things where you’d have to kind of just be a
little bit more cautious about what you’re doing there. Other than that, I mean,
pretty pretty cool. This is kind of magic, you know? It’s really great to see
companies like this coming up with these really innovative solutions to help us make that transition to more sustainable transportation. So let me know what you guys think in the comments down below. Don’t forget, when you free the
data, your mind will follow. See you guys back in the next one. (upbeat music) Hey, thanks for watching the video. I hope you got something out of it. If you want to dive a little bit deeper, become a part of the
Teslanomics community, consider joining us on Patreon. So what we have set up
are different things and ways to engage,
such as a discord group, which is like this chatroom,
that is just the folks that support the channel through Patreon. I’m on there almost daily
engaging in conversation about how Tesla and others like them are changing the world
around us for the better. So if you’d like to learn more, go ahead and go to
patreon.com/teslanomics. And I hope to see you there soon.

Double Your Tesla Charging Speed at Home!
Tagged on:                                                                                                                                                                                     

100 thoughts on “Double Your Tesla Charging Speed at Home!

  • August 2, 2019 at 5:06 pm
    Permalink

    If it can work for 220V what about 440v? coming from 4 different power outlet?

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 5:10 pm
    Permalink

    Every house or business supplied with “split phase” or three phase 208 volt power is a candidate for QUICK 220 (that’s virtually all houses and business in North America built in the last half decade).

    Any outlet that has GFCI will not work with Quick 220. Those outlets are located outdoors, or at locations with water present, like bathrooms and kitchens. It’s REALLY EASY to identify those GFCI outlets, since they usually have a TEST and RESET button, and maybe even a small green or red light.

    The easiest way to identify two of the 120 volt outlets for QUICK 220 is by looking at the circuit breaker box feeding the home or business. Pick one 120 volt outlet powered by the left side of the box, and one 120 volt outlet powered by the right side. Those will be on opposite phases, and be able to provide 208 or 240 volts when combined together with QUICK 220.

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 5:25 pm
    Permalink

    That outlet not wired correctly is dangerous! It could be hot to ground. If you have some thing metal grounded internally and you touch ground you could be electrocuted! You have to turn off the power and reverse the wires on the back of the outlet and then power back and test with tester. You should test every outlet in your house. If you have one, you probably have another.

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 6:18 pm
    Permalink

    Omg, i want tesla, i'm huge elon fan, but i guess i still buy just a gasoline car, to not have all this fuckarround charging storries…

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 6:47 pm
    Permalink

    That 220 to 110 volt adapter is flat out against the national electrical code .I also see no Underwriters labritory listing .This can not be sold in the us with out it.

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 7:23 pm
    Permalink

    No, I’ve never been on a road trip in a Tesla. Period. Lol

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 10:58 pm
    Permalink

    Why don't any of the other automakers build their EV's to be able to use the Tesla SuperCharger Network?

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 11:05 pm
    Permalink

    Just picked up my Model 3 SR Plus. I'm in SD also. Great videos Ben.

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 11:17 pm
    Permalink

    Wow, I use my 120v charger at home (Model 3) and get 5mi/ hour all the time, however, I made sure to use a separate 20 amp dedicated circuit with a 20 amp outlet as well. Still, the charger limits to 12 amps. So buying this device to get 6mi/hr doesn't seem practical unless you are away from home and could possibly get 10mi/hr. Even if you were away from home you would still have to find 2 outlets on different phases and probably more than likely be 15 amp shared circuits. Your house circuits that you used are probably 15 amp and shared as well. I wired my own nema 15-50 in my garage and get 7X the charge rate of just the 120v. Usually 30-35 mi/hr.

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 11:28 pm
    Permalink

    So lucky here in Australia (and other countries) with 240Volt / 10Amp as our normal outlet supply.

    Reply
  • August 3, 2019 at 3:01 am
    Permalink

    I get 5 miles per hour already on my model 3 from 1 plug. is that unusual? what would it change to if I used this?

    Reply
  • August 3, 2019 at 1:29 pm
    Permalink

    Thanks for sharing this video, man! Good stuff. May consider using at my parent's house (when visiting).

    Reply
  • August 3, 2019 at 2:40 pm
    Permalink

    Innovative, yes but too messy and a little too complicated for most people for a miniscule amount of energy (6 miles/hr). Otherwise this channel is such great help. How'd I have known about that gadget if it wasn't for you? Thanks.

    Reply
  • August 3, 2019 at 7:48 pm
    Permalink

    An excellent review. Beware of fake products though – where there is innovation, there'll be fraudsters too.

    Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 1:20 pm
    Permalink

    SERIOUSLY, If you are too cheap to use a Tesla super charger then why should I let you charge at my house for free? You do not pay for my gas when I come to your house. You electric car people would never in a million years pay for my gas. That is my answer also. NO!

    Reply
  • August 4, 2019 at 4:25 pm
    Permalink

    I would never charge at a constant rate with that many extra connections. Also in Norway that way of charging is actually illegal because of the fire hazard. There has been a lot of fires from garages and in house outlets because people have been using extension cords through windows and doorways to chage their electric cars. It gets hot even at 2-3kW constant charging. The best sollution and the only recommended one should be ONE dedicated outlet, straight to your car. No extension cords! Its costly to get installed some places, I know, but never put convenience in front of safety. Especially with older houses with older wiring and old connections.

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 6:31 am
    Permalink

    If you are going to use the product, you should know the following:

    – Most modern homes have extensive use of GFCI in outdoor, garage, kitchen, bathroom, and laundry room locations. This combiner will NOT work if plugged into a GFCI protected outlet.
    – This adaptor is for use in split phase 120/240V electrical systems or 120/208 electrical systems. All the foreigners commenting cannot use something like this.
    – You should use two extension cords to power the adaptor and then you should use the proper 6-15 adaptor for your Tesla Mobile Connector charge cable. You should not use an adaptor to adapt the 6-15 outlet to a standard 5-15 outlet because this allows you to plug any 120V device into the 240V connection, which is a hazard and will most likely fry anything not designed to work at 240V.
    – Your extension cords should be 12 Gauge wire. When wire runs are long, the voltage drops and if the voltage drops, the amps go up. Use 12 Gauge extension cords to ensure your cables are not getting hot and becoming a fire hazard.
    – Only use oultets that have tight connections. Loose outlets/connections create high resistance connections and there will be excessive heat buildup, which can melt the outlet or plug and can cause a fire.
    – Car charging is a continuous duty electrical application. You are not to exceed 80% of the circuits available amps. This is why 15 amp adaptors only charge at 12A, 20 at 16, 30 at 24, 50 at 40, 60 at 48, etc.
    – You should take care to ONLY plug this adaptor in when the car charger is unplugged from the 6-15 outlet. If you leave it plugged in and are in the process of plugging in the two inputs, there exists a situation where if you have one input plugged in, the other input will have a live prong that can electrocute you if you touch it. Plug your inputs in only when there is nothing plugged into the outlet.
    – Try to plug this adaptor into circuits that are not being utilized by other devices in the home. Car charging is a continuous duty application and if other things in the home are drawing from the same circuit as this adaptor, you can easily exceed the 80% limit you're supposed to follow. Drawing 15 amps continuously from a 15 amp breaker will not cause the breaker to trip, but the wires will start to become very hot. It's an unsafe situation.

    – I honestly do not know why anyone would make and sell this adaptor. It's just a lawsuit waiting to happen for the company. Not to mention that this adaptor would NEVER be approved by any testing agency or electrical code. It's simply not to code and can be used in numerous unsafe ways.

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 9:22 am
    Permalink

    In your garage on the wall it very much looked like you had two separate outlets on different circuits. You probably could have run your experiment from there, which looked like it was just a few feet from your cars. 🙂

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 11:05 am
    Permalink

    I'm pretty sure they're the same phase, but different bus bars.

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 12:43 pm
    Permalink

    Great

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 5:37 pm
    Permalink

    Just a quick remark: if you want to show how many miles per hour your Tesla is charging, make sure the heating (A/C) is off (close the doors, watch through the windows). Especially with lower currents (charging at home), the heating (A/C) overhead is enormous; the hours-to-completely-full indication is off by far this way. Or in other words: you're ruining your data this way.

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 5:47 pm
    Permalink

    TWO DIFFERENT OUTLETS IS NOT ENOUGH!!!

    PLEASE READ BEFORE ORDERING!!!

    IT HAS TO BE TWO SEPARATE CIRCUITS! IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE DON'T BUY THIS.

    THIS THING IS A FIRE HAZARD JUST WAITING TO HAPPEN WHEN PEOPLE DON'T UNDERSTAND HOW BREAKERS AND ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS WORK.

    Another thing, a normal extension cord will melt if you put that much power through it. You must use high capacity cords.

    Reply
  • August 5, 2019 at 11:52 pm
    Permalink

    Ben, thanks for this. Really interested, but what I need to know is how to find out if the plugs are on different circuits. I am in cold, cold Montreal. I am in a small Condo complex, exterior parking, with a row of block heaters for winter heating of the oil pan. I cannot imagine these are all on the circuit, but I need to test before purchasing your great gismo! Unfortunately the Condo committee needs 6 months to make a decision on letting me install a charger. Thanks for your advice.

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 2:13 am
    Permalink

    location in home does not set the side of the 110 supply has to do with the circuit breaker location. and a home is a single phaze just has power coming in the home in parallel

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 7:56 am
    Permalink

    just move to EU 😀

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 8:30 am
    Permalink

    Loved this video 🙂

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 3:47 pm
    Permalink

    Uh in France we have 230V and sometimes 240V

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 4:55 pm
    Permalink

    This is exactly what I use to charge my Model 3 at home. Didn't want to spend $1500 upgrading the electric service since I'm moving within the year. It's still slow, but it beats a single plug. I can charge 30%-80% in 14 hours.

    I get 3kw which on the Long Range Model 3 RWD gets me about 10-11 mph charge.

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 5:31 pm
    Permalink

    This video could have (should have) been 3 minutes long.

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 8:47 pm
    Permalink

    Any solution to double the charge speed for people living in the EU? 😁

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 10:45 pm
    Permalink

    I'm living in Europe so here that is not a problem, but i think it's a great opportunity to get double charging speed, for the Tesla user's in the USA. Do you think we can do it in Europe to, with 220-230 V in the outlet?

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 3:48 am
    Permalink

    Would a dryer outlet work in lieu of this contraption?

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 4:29 am
    Permalink

    Tesla …… NOT TEZLA!!! Say it again and I’m banning you from chasing me around the Internet !!! Lol

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 4:42 am
    Permalink

    why don't you just plug it into the dryer outlet? pretty sure those are 220

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 6:30 am
    Permalink

    Nice vid but IRL, you won’t have the opportunity to plug into different outlets unless u r at a friends house. Never would work a hotel right? Am I missing something…

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 1:08 pm
    Permalink

    It cost me about $200 to have a 240v outlet with a 14-50 plug installed by a licensed electrician here in Massachusetts. I do not recommend using extension cords to charge your Tesla. I understand that this device is intended for times where a 240v outlet is not available, but you should emphasize that this is not the way to charge your Tesla every day.

    BTW, the 'standard' charging for any Tesla is 240v, so no, you really aren't doubling your charging speed.

    Reply
  • August 8, 2019 at 4:46 pm
    Permalink

    Is that a 16 gauge extension cord you're using?

    Reply
  • August 9, 2019 at 8:08 am
    Permalink

    Split phase really seems to mean that your house is connected on 2 phases at 110/120V, 180 degrees apart. In Europe, houses are typically connected at 3 phases at 230/240V, 120 degrees apart. The European Type2 connector (which is on all European Teslas as well) is also 3-phase. The normal Tesla wall box can be connected to three-phase 16A, which gets you ~11 kW. The mobile charger that comes with the European Model 3 only has one phase connected, which then limits you to a third of that on a proper 16A-continuous connection.

    Is three-phase a thing in the US?

    Reply
  • August 10, 2019 at 12:36 pm
    Permalink

    You can also use the 240V from the dryer outlet

    Reply
  • August 10, 2019 at 3:19 pm
    Permalink

    This video should be named "How to not charge your Tesla at home".
    Stuff like this should only be used in emergency cases. Get a charger installed or an outlet that has a higher rating than normal outlets (NEMA or whatever you call it in the US or CEE in Europe), if you pick the last choice, make sure you protect your house, car and installation with a GFCI/RCD that is rated for charging electric vehicles.

    Reply
  • August 11, 2019 at 11:43 am
    Permalink

    In India 220V will be the regular outlet
    for 3phase setup 440 V can I combine 2*440v

    Reply
  • August 11, 2019 at 8:21 pm
    Permalink

    What happens if you plug in one side into a 220 (like a a dryer outlet) and the other into a 110? Would the box handle that?

    Reply
  • August 12, 2019 at 4:31 am
    Permalink

    Probably not a good idea to "fast charge" your car on a regular occurrence. These cars are designed for specific charging characteristics and deviating from it often will likely degrade your battery. NOT A GOOD IDEA.

    Reply
  • August 12, 2019 at 5:39 am
    Permalink

    I'm a bit baffled by the charge speeds. 6 miles per hour? My regular outlet does 40km (25 miles) per hour and when I combine phases I get 70km (43 miles). That is acceptable IMHO for letting an ev be an alternative to ice cars.

    Reply
  • August 12, 2019 at 5:42 pm
    Permalink

    Plug multiple plug splitters into one another, charge your tesla to max in a couple minutes

    Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 11:24 am
    Permalink

    He's playing with fire, if one of your viewers decides to go cheap and buys a non UL listed wiring that sets his house on fire….. It's on you 😨

    Reply
  • August 13, 2019 at 9:27 pm
    Permalink

    Yes this is good if you’re in a bind. I had a 2- 240 plugs on separate 60 amp breakers. One in my sub panel and the other installed on the main panel. I also have 3 cords. One in the back of the garage and one in the front. I cannot use them both at the same time but oh well.

    I would recommend not using anything less than a 12 gauge extension cord. That’s a lot of power going through there my friends

    Reply
  • August 15, 2019 at 2:05 pm
    Permalink

    "Supergood" my new catchphrase

    Reply
  • August 15, 2019 at 2:56 pm
    Permalink

    I have a 2013 nissan leaf will it work with my leaf umc

    Reply
  • August 15, 2019 at 3:52 pm
    Permalink

    I guess that this is useful if you are away from home and charge somewhere.

    New subscriber here, and I don't skip ads.

    Reply
  • August 16, 2019 at 4:07 am
    Permalink

    You get 6mph charge using a standard 20 amp outlet also and you don’t need that box

    Reply
  • August 16, 2019 at 8:14 pm
    Permalink

    Try using an adapter to go to nema 14-50 then bump the amperage to 15-20 amps.

    Reply
  • August 17, 2019 at 3:12 am
    Permalink

    Not worth the aggravation of youcan afford a Tesla you can get a Tesla charger installed.

    Reply
  • August 18, 2019 at 12:35 pm
    Permalink

    What electric voltage in US is it 110-120v?

    Reply
  • August 21, 2019 at 5:16 am
    Permalink

    Can you use 2 of these and get quadruple the speed?

    Reply
  • August 21, 2019 at 12:15 pm
    Permalink

    New to Tesla here. How fast does the Tesla charger increase mileage per hour at home?

    Reply
  • August 22, 2019 at 4:44 pm
    Permalink

    tl;dr Save your money and the effort learning all about these and how to use them since you'll likely never use it.

    I bought one of these when we got our first Tesla because on paper it seemed super sweet. In reality though we've almost never had a need for it and when we had it wasn't an option based on various wiring short comings at the location where we were located. Very select uses with numerous restrictions makes this almost never an option save for the very fringe outlier.

    I still carry it in my travel charge adapter kit (I made my own adapters for just about every possible 50A, 30A, 20A outlet we'd see in the US) since I already paid for it so I hope that someday we have a situation where we're in the middle of nowhere w/o proper options (about as likely as planning to drive somewhere where there's just no gas in an ICE car and being surprised and stranded when there is none) and the conditions actually allow for it but I'm not super hopeful.

    If you have a specific case use for it regularly & are already aware of what that is and have confirmed it will work for you then this will likely be very useful and worth the price tag. For the other 99.9999% of us though it's kind of a waste of money IMO.

    Good video as always though Ben, keep it up!

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 12:37 am
    Permalink

    I guess the model three charges faster because I got 6 miles an hour with my 110 plug in

    Reply
  • August 24, 2019 at 11:53 pm
    Permalink

    Charge slower unless you actually need the speed. It's easier on both the grid and battery pack.

    Reply
  • August 27, 2019 at 4:50 pm
    Permalink

    Can you triple?

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 1:59 am
    Permalink

    FYI…. its 240 in the USA..

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 2:00 am
    Permalink

    FYI.. its 240 in the USA..

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 6:05 pm
    Permalink

    what if we use 3 of this device, 4 different outlets, can we make 4 times fast or 440 volts?

    Reply
  • August 30, 2019 at 7:19 am
    Permalink

    How is this evolution? What a pain in the arse can’t say I will be buying a Tesla yet

    Reply
  • September 3, 2019 at 6:11 pm
    Permalink

    I don't know how this can be code when code requires the simultaneous breaking of paired circuits? Hence the little bar going between the switches on a double-pole breaker. Also, the likelihood of two separately phased outlets being as close as those cords are short is not very good. Better off just running a proper circuit.

    Reply
  • September 4, 2019 at 11:50 pm
    Permalink

    I get 5mph on a standard wall outlet. One more mph for all that hassle isn’t worth it.

    Reply
  • September 6, 2019 at 12:33 am
    Permalink

    I don't think that extension cord is rated for 220volts…..

    Reply
  • September 9, 2019 at 7:32 am
    Permalink

    How NOT to unplug wires – pull the wires at teh wires instead of the connector to break them long term! – please pull at the connectors…… like, the hard part. 🙂

    Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 1:33 am
    Permalink

    Try your 230v clothes dryer outlet and an extension cord, do all homes have two phases? Electrician?

    Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 2:30 pm
    Permalink

    save money…your dryer will be on 220 volt or america become like the rest of the world and get 240 volts standard voltage…and dont forget the metric system

    Reply
  • September 11, 2019 at 5:13 pm
    Permalink

    Will this blow a 110v 20 amp breaker?…Will this blow a 110v 30 amp breaker???..How many amps will this draw? Will this overheat my wiring??.I only have one circuit in my garage.
    I only use 220v for my central air.

    Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 12:31 pm
    Permalink

    Would be great for renters who can't get a 240v outlet installed outside or in their garage. Would mean a lot of extra extension cords to pack in the frunk for a road trip, though.

    Reply
  • September 12, 2019 at 7:38 pm
    Permalink

    You can get a 240v line installed by an electrician for not much more money.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 6:24 am
    Permalink

    This is a pretty cool idea but it's pretty sketchy if you don't understand how electricity works between phases and circuits. I would not recommend this to any average Joe.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 8:31 am
    Permalink

    If you don't know what you're doing with electricity, don't play with stuff like this. And Ben, not to be rude, but you don't seem to know what you're doing here.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 3:01 pm
    Permalink

    Love this guy if he could understand its Tes-la not Tez-la. Ahhh

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 6:04 pm
    Permalink

    This looks like a fire accident waiting to happen… Also, maybe Americans should just get with the game and switch to 240V like the rest of us 😜

    Over here in the Netherlands having 3 phase 240V is very common. You get over 30 miles/hour on those.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 6:40 pm
    Permalink

    Houses are in US are not normally built with 3 phase power. I think he’s trying to say it has to be plugged into two separate circuits, not phases.

    Reply
  • September 13, 2019 at 10:08 pm
    Permalink

    Oh wow Ben styled his hair! Kudos hanny! 😛

    Reply
  • September 14, 2019 at 12:54 am
    Permalink

    Using standard extension cords makes this set up dangerous. Your overnight charge might end up being the last stupid thing you've done in your life 😉

    Reply
  • September 14, 2019 at 3:50 am
    Permalink

    Usually kitchen counters are split duplex receptacles. you will find your different phases there. you can plug one on the top and the other on the bottom.

    Reply
  • September 15, 2019 at 6:30 am
    Permalink

    lol.. This setup would be like super illegal Norway.

    Reply
  • September 16, 2019 at 3:38 pm
    Permalink

    Do they make this for a chevy bolt please? Or will it work for a chevy bolt i should say.

    Reply
  • September 18, 2019 at 12:59 am
    Permalink

    I didn't know they had Chinese outlets
    1:36

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 8:43 am
    Permalink

    Don't say: "Different outlets" you mean different circuits, which means you make sure you're plugging it into the device into TWO separate circuits. If you plug both of them in, you could pop the breaker. I am also guessing the device has the ability to keep both running circuits in phase.

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 11:10 am
    Permalink

    It's there no way to have a tiny petrol engine that genset style creates massive voltage from petrol?

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 3:43 pm
    Permalink

    Just a question but are you related to the guy from the action lab Chanel

    Reply
  • September 19, 2019 at 3:43 pm
    Permalink

    You look similar

    Reply
  • September 20, 2019 at 1:01 pm
    Permalink

    Does this sort of kit exist in the UK?

    Reply
  • September 22, 2019 at 11:50 am
    Permalink

    Or you could live in a country that doesn't have a archaic power standard…. Much like your standard of measurements

    Reply
  • September 23, 2019 at 10:02 am
    Permalink

    In Australia all our power outlets are 240V :3

    Reply
  • September 24, 2019 at 1:51 pm
    Permalink

    Since I don't own an EV, I was surprised to see the charging rates were quite that terrible at 2-3 MPH @ 115V & 6 MPH @ 230V. I always imagined rates would be double or triple that.

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 9:57 pm
    Permalink

    I see a melted outlet coming

    Reply
  • September 28, 2019 at 12:12 pm
    Permalink

    Most homes have a 200v plug somewhere. Much easier to just plug into that.

    Reply
  • September 29, 2019 at 8:04 pm
    Permalink

    How many techs out there with a face palm on their face lol.

    Reply
  • October 6, 2019 at 6:09 pm
    Permalink

    you could do all this without that quick 220

    Reply
  • October 7, 2019 at 12:48 am
    Permalink

    1:28 Bob’s your uncle is my new favorite saying, first time I’ve heard it.

    Reply
  • October 8, 2019 at 7:10 pm
    Permalink

    can you put two off the quick 220 together?

    Reply
  • October 10, 2019 at 8:14 am
    Permalink

    What a convenient way to refuel your car…… not. Think I'll stick with ICE for now

    Reply
  • October 12, 2019 at 1:11 pm
    Permalink

    I don’t want it even if I can’t afford an EV!!😅😅

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *