welcome friends today in the kitchen we
are making ricotta or ricotta which is
fresh cheese made from way at least in
the sort of og original old-school way
it’s made from way and whey is what’s
left over from cheese making so in a
previous episode we made two kinds of
cottage cheese one made with vinegar and
one made with a rennet which has left us
with two pots of whey and you can tell
them apart because the pot that is a
really white opaque way was made with
vinegar and the one that’s sort of clear
and yellow was made with a rennet now
most online recipes for ricotta say to
take whole milk heat it up put in an
acid either vinegar or lemon juice and
then skim out the the curds and that’s
your ricotta that is more akin to a
cottage cheese which is what we made in
the last episode here and you don’t even
have to add anything at this point I’m
just gonna bring these up to about a
hundred and eighty degrees Fahrenheit
and the cheese is just going to appear
all on its own so let’s watch that
process happen so I don’t know if the
camera can pick it up but we’re at about
155 degrees Fahrenheit and you can
already see the little curds forming in
this pot just give it a couple more
minutes and you’ll notice a real
difference
okay now you should be able to see it
look at all those curds starting to come
together and you can see the way is
starting to turn into that yellowy clear
liquid that we have here with this
rennet version there’s not much there’s
not much coming together in this one yet
so this pot at the front we’re gonna get
quite a bit of ricotta out of it and I
suspect that’s because we got so little
cottage cheese out of it in the first
process this second pot I don’t think
I’m going to get much ricotta out of it
at all and that’s probably because I had
such a high yield of cheese in the first
place so I’m gonna try something
gonna add a little bit of acid this is
vinegar mixed with water and I’m just
gonna mix this in and this is probably
why so many online recipes tell you to
add milk or cream to your way to
increase the yield because I have to
suspect that if you’re boiling real way
from real cheese-making
there’s not much protein left and you’re
gonna have to you’re gonna have to cook
a lot away to make any ricotta okay so
it’s time to scoop this out now you can
pour it into a cheesecloth line sieve or
do as I’m doing here and pull it out
with a little sieve I’m scooping it out
because I’ve got to tell you we’ve got
so much going on in the studio today I’m
out of giant bowls so I’ve got I’ve got
a bunch of these really fine mesh scoops
and so I’m just gonna scoop this out and
get as much as I can now this one the
curd is forming very small amounts of
curd so I have to say for this amount of
way if you’re doing a traditional cheese
and you’ve only made a small little
amount I made like a liter and a half of
milk into cheese trying to make ricotta
not worth it but if you are making the
acid-based cottage cheese then making
ricotta afterwards definitely is and if
you’re making the acid based ricotta
from whole milk take that first one
don’t call it reco to call it cottage
cheese and then do this process and
you’ll actually have ricotta so I think
all of those other recipes stopped short
of where they should but let’s get
Julian here and taste test okay so we
this is the ricotta then this is some
guess is it ricotta ricotta ricotta
ricotta ricotta I don’t know there’s so
many different ways to say it I hear all
because it’s the way cheese this is the
this is wave cheese this is way cheesy
yes so this is this is
he’s made from way which is the leftover
from the other cheese making processes
all right so just looking at it very
quickly this one looks much creamier yep
than this one okay I have no good
feeling okay I’m assuming when it’s
purchase so yeah one is one is
store-bought what a store-bought and one
I made so let’s just first super creamy
um it’s got a tang to it
yep anything else again mouthfeel for me
i it’s got a grainy gritty yeah almost
like not quite Sam it does make me want
to guess that it it’s okay the homemade
no guessing that’s supposed to do right
yeah we’ll taste both first so
you’ve used the same spoon
oh so this one has this one is more
bland yes then this one yep I like the
texture on this one
the texture is firm on this one whereas
this one is this one’s creamier but it’s
got that that grit to me I find though
that I find this one I like the flavor
of this one better I like the flavor
this one better yeah me too I like that
better meet you store-bought homemade
really yep I’m surprised because though
when we did the the way that you majors
from came from you making cottage cheese
right yes and that cottage cheese when
you made it provide a gritty flavor made
the cottage cheese that it came from had
a gritty Flint gritty texture to it and
which is why I thought oh it’s gritty it
must be the same but no no no this is
interesting so but that’s the flavor
that’s in the cottage cheese that you
made from this way so I think it I think
it took the flavor out yes and left you
this behind yes hmm so there’s there’s
it almost makes me feel that there’s
something going on with the store-bought
that they’re they’re making it to a
flavor profile if they want maybe
whereas this is it could also be that
the store-bought they were making it
purposefully versus yes seeing a second
product so you’ve already taken off
something uh which could which could be
I mean if we could find authentic real
ricotta I mean this is this is what’s
available in the store cannabis can in a
supermarket ricotta yeah so I mean it
you know I feel it trip to some cheese
making nation yeah and but you know
listen I mean and it’s not bad
I would I would cook what not I would
definitely cook with that and I and the
flavor is okay it’s just that flavor is
better but that textures better
so dig knowing take from it what you
will
yes there’s no clear winner in this in
this case I don’t think thanks for
stopping by today okay I need a shot
just

🔵 Making Ricotta (Ricottone) From Scratch

78 thoughts on “🔵 Making Ricotta (Ricottone) From Scratch

  • April 11, 2019 at 7:25 pm
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    So the ricotta made from the whey of the vinegar cottage cheese is bland from just lack of flavor or did it need some salt? So I assume you got nothing from the rennet batch or whey too little? 😏

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 7:30 pm
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    Thanks for watching. If you liked it – subscribe, give us a thumbs up, comment, and check out our channel for more great recipes. Please click that share button and share with your friends on Reddit, Twitter, and Facebook.

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 7:39 pm
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    I wonder if the storebought mixes the two kinds to make a in-the-middle kind of cheese to satisfy the masses?

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 7:44 pm
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    Hi Glen, do you have a recipe for real Canadian cheese curds? They are impossible to find here in the UK

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 7:44 pm
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    I saw you from the cola video and now I’m in a loop of watching your videos

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 8:31 pm
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    Subscribed after the Coca Cola video. Excellent channel!

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 11:03 pm
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    The store bought version may include a little more acid, salt(?), or just that it's been aged in the warehouse/store/etc.

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 11:05 pm
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    I believe you can do it.

    Please make Poutine with ingredients available in the UK.

    So it's the curds we don't have or can easily get. We have any other cheese you need. I really need to try it.

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 11:23 pm
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    Nice! I've already done this cheese on my university. We just had to use a "thing" to dry the ricotta, we add a bit of salt. It's great!

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 11:42 pm
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    The cola episode hit my front page and I'm hooked! Subscribed duuuude!

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 12:15 am
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    Why are women today trying to talk in a deep voice??? Bet she didn't sound like that when she was 25.
    Oh by the way…. great video and channel, you make grey hair look cool.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 12:33 am
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    👍🏻

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 12:39 am
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    I love this channel so much! You remind me of a cooking Rick Steves!

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 12:54 am
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    Really like the video, Thanks for being honest and giving the real deal🧀🧀

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 1:02 am
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    Yeah man. I like you and Julie. I came with the wave of that coca cola video, and your vids just feel.. nice. When I need sth to relax, I'll come back and binge watch some more 🙂

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 1:24 am
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    This channel makes me happy

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 1:30 am
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    Hi great video. The grittiness from the store bought ricotta is probably a stabilizer or starch of some kind.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 3:07 am
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    Love your videos! I suppose if you use it in a lasagna the minute difference in taste wouldn't matter.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 3:29 am
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    How long have you and Sybill Trelawney been married?

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 3:30 am
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    My friend you need to visit a Peruvian restaurant, they won 8 years best food around the world in events in America and Europe.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 3:51 am
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    This channels production quality is extremely high and imo deserves more subs (came from Coca-Cola video)

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 4:07 am
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    Hi! My mom and I can't figure out how to make the perfect chocolate lava cake! Do you think you can give it a try?

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 4:28 am
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    I'm amused by how interesting i found your channel to be, the idea for me is so "new" and the production quality is very nice and you are very charismatic !

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 6:39 am
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    Dad?

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 8:11 am
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    When I had my Cafe in the Philippines I need and ricotta to make cannoli lasagna Etc but the ricotta was all imported and grossly expensive. I made my own but it always came out somewhat too dry coarse. I saw this by putting it in a blender for a few minutes and adding a little bit bit of water and salt of course that did the trick! When using ricotta for lasagna and ravioli a little bit of sugar also add very small amount I also put in some parsley.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 8:58 am
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    Oh MAN you are gonna blow up, just watch.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 9:45 am
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    this is absolutely my new favorite cooking channel

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 9:46 am
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    LoL OG Cheese! Gangster… Rennetators, can't be any geek off the street,got to be handy with the cheese if you know what I mean:
    https://youtu.be/1plPyJdXKIY

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 10:19 am
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    Pronounced REE–COE–TA, meaning cooked again.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 12:10 pm
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    Are u and richard dawkins relatives?

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 1:16 pm
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    Ricotta (for me) is such a highly variable cheese. Generally supermarket brands are terrible, granted I live in an area where there is always an abundance of all kinds of cheeses so that makes me a bit biased I suppose. I might actually have to give this one a try though!

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 1:54 pm
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    Does that emoji put you on the top of the list? People used to use non-letter/non-number signs to do that. (Like !, #, *, etc)

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 3:03 pm
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    Don't you suspect the term "cottage cheese" really came from the same root as (or directly from) "ricotta" in the first place?  If so that might imply that the distinction between these dairy products could be a relatively modern thing and more related to the process used to produce it.

    Reply
  • April 12, 2019 at 4:50 pm
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    Good Channel Keep It Going ! Chef

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 1:41 am
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    Is Julie Glens wife or youtube partner/manager or what

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 3:03 am
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    never had ricotta that wasn't just sweet (except great value brand, that stuff is just bland)

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 3:16 am
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    Before plastic food containers were available in stores, in the 30s, I was wondering what cottage cheese was sold in. Then I realized that people probably made their own, and stored it in a glass or ceramic dish.

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 3:56 am
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    Sicilians here in NY in the US pronounce ricotta as riggút.

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 4:34 am
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    This channel needs some background relaxing music

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 4:52 am
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    your channels so great! also came from the coca cola video!

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 7:22 am
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    Salt would have made the difference…

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 8:55 am
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    add salt n butter

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 10:47 am
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    If you're interested in more complex cheese recipes check out Gavin Webber. His channel is all about cheese making and he's recently started doing taste tests of cheeses available here in Australian supermarkets.
    If you wanted to make a larger amount of ricotta you could press and age it to make ricotta salata.

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 3:25 pm
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    She says it perfectly first try

    Reply
  • April 14, 2019 at 5:19 am
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    The have a new book out; The Evolution of Divine Dining by Richard Dawkins and Sybill Trelawney.

    Reply
  • April 14, 2019 at 11:29 am
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    I like how there is no music at all. It's so relaxing. Also I like fact that that you're speaking Canadian
    Btw, I have always thought that you use Celcius in Canada

    Reply
  • April 14, 2019 at 3:48 pm
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    Thank you for specifying that ricotta is made from whey, not whole milk or cream! Traditionally it would be made from whey from cheese made by heating or cooking the milk to curdle it the first time, which would have been used to make a cheese for sale, and the ricotta was made by heating or cooking the whey a second time in order to get a second batch of cheese for family use out of the same amount of milk. My great-grandmother used to make it! The store-bought ricotta always has stabilizers and other additives in it, so it's different.

    Reply
  • April 15, 2019 at 11:13 pm
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    What would happen if you made vinegar cottage cheese and then mixed it with ricotta from resulting whey?

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  • April 16, 2019 at 8:48 am
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    My homemade ricotta (from rennet whey after making mozzarella) was really gritty. I didn’t like it.

    Reply
  • April 17, 2019 at 1:42 pm
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    This channel has quickly become one of my favorite Youtube channels. I've been watching video after video and they've all been excellent. Thank you so much for the great content!

    Reply
  • April 17, 2019 at 6:29 pm
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    The way Glen talks about yield and calls his cooking a "process" makes me feel like he's taken chemical engineering

    Reply
  • April 19, 2019 at 7:05 am
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    I came from.the cola video watched it about a week ago been watching all i can i have passed your videos over to my mom to try some 🙂

    Reply
  • April 20, 2019 at 7:21 am
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    Did people eat the curds and whey together…ala Little Miss Muffet??

    Reply
  • April 23, 2019 at 9:34 am
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    If you want good ricotta in the GTA instead of that supermarket stuff check out Grande Cheese, they have a few locations in the Toronto suburbs and make it there fresh

    Reply
  • April 24, 2019 at 3:27 am
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    just add a bit of salt

    Reply
  • April 24, 2019 at 4:46 am
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    Add salt to your cheese! It’ll make it less bland!

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  • May 5, 2019 at 11:35 pm
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    I do know a lot of storebought riccota the whey does have skim milk added to it to increase yields. Maybe that's the difference?

    Reply
  • May 8, 2019 at 8:49 pm
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    Why go to a "Cheese making nation"? Come to Wisconsin, just south of the border and we export cheese to all of the nations you'd visit anyhow.

    Reply
  • May 15, 2019 at 10:53 am
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    How does this differ from paneer cheese?

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  • May 18, 2019 at 12:52 pm
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    I make something similar to a quark cheese …, it's my homemade greek yoghurt strained in a cheesecloth. The whey is a pale yellow, which I discard, although I have used it as liquid in a smoothie, as it is supposedly very healthy for you.
    My electric one-pot pressure cooker set to yoghurt mode, whole milk, greek yoghurt as a starter. Boil milk in the one-pot, let it cool to 42C or a little lower, whisk in the starter, the one-pot keeps it at around body temp for 12 hours or so, strain really well in a cloth …., you get a spreadable, clean tasting soft "cheese".

    Reply
  • May 20, 2019 at 8:13 am
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    This is amazing! For a while now I've wanted to make my own paneer, but couldn't figure out what to do with the whey.
    I'm definitely going to need to give this a try.

    Reply
  • May 23, 2019 at 7:31 am
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    Try some different acids, like lemon juice, lime juice, even pineapple juice, etc.

    Reply
  • May 25, 2019 at 7:33 am
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    My family is from Sicily and my grandmother told us the way she was shown how to make Racicot cheese was to take whole milk bring it to boil squeeze half a lemon in and let it simmer for 10 or so minutes. Cheese cloth it and that's Racicot

    Reply
  • May 30, 2019 at 6:00 pm
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    Cheese making nation closest to you = Wisconson

    Reply
  • June 11, 2019 at 2:55 am
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    The funny thing is in the cottage cheese video Glen chooses the mouth feel over the flavor. In this video the exact opposite lol

    Reply
  • June 11, 2019 at 11:25 am
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    Went to a pizzeria today after I saw this and was doing a create your own. Saw ricotta and asked if it was house made or it was store bought. And if it was store made than what method they used. I got the absolute blankest stare I’ve ever seen. However it was very flavorless and slightly gritty

    Reply
  • June 17, 2019 at 8:19 pm
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    I make a cottage cheese using the vinegar (lemon juice) method but your ricotta temperature. I also salt the milk and add cream to raise the fat content. It's creamy and flavorful with a smooth texture.

    Reply
  • July 2, 2019 at 5:15 pm
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    Hey everybody– The best use for any leftover whey, whether or not it is first used to make ricotta, is to use it as a cooking liquid for lentils. Whey is extremely nutritious, and when lentils are cooked in whey instead of water they pack a real nutritive punch. The flavor and texture is delicious, too. I hope this helps.

    Reply
  • July 11, 2019 at 3:43 am
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    My Brooklyn Italian family (on both sides) always pronounced it Ri-goat-tha. I still don't know what to make of it. We still have a few salumerias left that make fresh daily.

    Reply
  • July 18, 2019 at 11:39 am
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    Can you put salt in it?

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  • August 18, 2019 at 5:37 am
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    Hi Glen, your channel is a delight! I made the "cottage cheese" using the vinegar method to begin with today and it's nice, I mixed it with some cream afterward. But I got zero ricotta from the whey though I really squeezed the cheese well. May the problem be that I rinse the cheese and squeezed that water into the whey again? I am sad. 😀 thanks a lot!

    Reply
  • August 26, 2019 at 6:51 pm
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    Best ricotta recipe is from Saveur. It's awesome. Well worth making

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  • August 29, 2019 at 4:27 am
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    Is it necessary to let the whey cool down after making the first cheese, or can you continue while it's warm?

    Reply
  • September 26, 2019 at 6:41 pm
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    What would happen if you left the cottage cheese in the vinegar whey and kept cooking it,would the ricotta cheese come out and mix the two flavours together for a better final product or will the ricotta not form while the cottage cheese is still there.

    Reply
  • October 1, 2019 at 5:42 pm
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    How would we make homemade mascarpone?

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  • October 19, 2019 at 12:27 pm
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    finally
    i've been looking for rickota made from whey for ages

    Reply
  • October 21, 2019 at 9:01 am
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    Our good friend Charlie Lombardo from Long Island insists that you must say 'ri-GOAT', with the 'R' slightly rolled. He drops the last 'A'. And he also says "Watsamattahwiyou, you can't say it right!" hen we say 'ri-COT-tuh'. I suspect that his pronunciation is 'low-Italian' (so to speak).

    Reply
  • October 26, 2019 at 3:53 am
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    When researching fermenting my own creme fraiche I looked into the specific mesophillic bacteria I was using from the "buttermilk". Turns out that yes, it is aerophillic, but it is microaerophillic! The creme fraiche I was making was always missing that "tang" I was looking for, and it was due to the fact that the bacteria was looking for a low oxygen environment. Yes, it proliferates enough to cause the curd to set, but it needs a ~2% oxygen environment to truly thrive and create the flavors we are looking for, which will not happen in a shallow pot where oxygen can diffuse through the entire working stock. It works in the large vats in industrial settings, but we must make that setting ourselves in the home kitchen by placing the cultured milk in a sealed container to reduce the oxygen during the fermentation period. I found bringing it to 99f for 4 hours to get all of the bacteria to proliferate, then giving it another 4-8 hours at room temperature allowed the bacteria to thrive enough to give it the tang and flavor I was looking for while maintaining the texture and not expelling too much whey. This may be a tactic you need to use with cottage cheese to develop the flavor you are looking for as well.

    Reply

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